Soursop Benefits

Soursop is a prickly green tropical fruit that also goes by the name graviola, paw paw and guanabana.

It is touted as an alternative cancer treatment, although the pharmaceutical industry surely does not want the word to get out about soursop’s potential health benefits.

The benefits of soursop as an anti-cancer treatment are still being studied, however, there are some good indicators at this point.

Here is a quote from trueactivist.com:

“The first promising study of soursop occurred in 1996 when researchers found a compound extracted from the fruit was deadly to cancer cells but allowed healthy cells to live. They discovered not only did the compound selectively annihilate cancer cells, but it did so at a rate 10,000 greater than the common and harmful anti-cancer drug andriamycin. Andriamycin, incidentally, is nicknamed the “red devil” because of its color and it’s potentially deadly side effects.

In 1999, another study found soursop compounds to be effective at reducing prostate and breast cancer cell activity. In 2002, scientists learned it could similarly inhibit liver cancer activity. Finally, in 2011, a study published in the journal Nutrition and Cancer, affirmed its anti-breast cancer activities.

Researchers on the latest study found that simply eating soursop could have incredible anti-cancer benefits in animals with a an over-expressed gene that frequently leads to breast cancer. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a cancer-causing gene commonly over-expressed in breast cancer patients.

According to the study authors:

“These data showed that dietary GFE induced significant growth inhibition of MDA-MB-468 cells in vitro and in vivo through a mechanism involving the EGFR/ERK signaling pathway, suggesting that GFE may have a protective effect for women against EGFR-overexpressing BC [breast cancer].”

My view is that soursop definitely has potential as a cancer treatment (or for cancer prevention) and while there is no definitive mainstream research at this point, it seems to me that this is definitely one of those cases where “the powers that be” definitely don’t want you to know.

It would not hurt to try taking soursop as a supplement, as long as you stick to reasonable doses. Too much soursop can have negative side effects.

 

You can get a free trial bottle of soursop supplement pills right here.